Improve Your Air Quality

In general, indoor air is four to five times more polluted than outdoor air. Approximately 87% of American homeowners are unaware of indoor air pollution.

GET TO KNOW PARTICULATES

There’s more in the air than you can easily see—particles, dust and smoke, all of them potential triggers for asthma and allergy attacks. Particles like dust, smoke and bacteria are often .3 microns or less. At that size, allergens can get deep into your lungs because they aren’t filtered well by your nose and throat.

REDUCE PARTICULATES WITH AN AIR CLEANING SYSTEM

An effective whole-house air cleaner, such as Trane CleanEffects™, can reduce the presence of potential asthma and allergy attack triggers in your home. Get rid of the majority of particles like dust, pollen, pet hair and dander, dust mites, mildew, lint, fungus, most tobacco smoke, cooking grease, and even bacteria.

REDUCE ALLERGENS

As published in BioMed Central Journal, an independent publishing house committed to providing access to peer-reviewed biomedical research, Trane CleanEffects™ has been shown to reduce triggers for allergies and asthma. It removes up to 99.98% and particles and allergens from the filtered air. Installing Trane CleanEffects™ can be an important part of your overall allergy and asthma management plan.

EXPERT ALLERGY TIPS

Here are allergy experts’ tips for managing allergies and asthma in the home:

  • Control dust mites — Use anti-dust mite covers and wash sheets in hot water at least once a week; 130 degrees is recommended.
  • Eliminate mold sources – Fix leaky pipes and keep bathroom grout clean.
  • Stay smoke-free — Avoid non-ventilated, smoky rooms and second-hand smoke.
  • Avoid pet dander — Keep pets off the furniture, out of the bedroom, and if necessary, consider taking the pet out of the home.
  • Close doors and windows — Keep windows and doors shut to keep outdoor pollens, molds and irritants outside.
  • Install a whole-house air cleaner — An air cleaning system, such as Trane CleanEffects™ removes airborne particles and allergens too tiny for your nose and mouth to filter naturally. In addition to taking steps to control allergens in the home, you should always see an allergist to determine the cause of your symptoms. An allergy specialist can run a series of simple blood or skin tests to determine if your asthma symptoms are allergy-related.

SAY GOODBYE TO DUST

Have you ever felt that no matter how often you dust the dust seems to reappear the next day? You’re not alone. The average six-room house collects 40 pounds of dust each year. New studies show that the installation of Trane CleanEffects™ reduces dust accumulation in your home by more than 50%.

DID YOU KNOW?

  • According to a study by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, indoor air contaminants are responsible for or aggravate half of all illnesses.
  • Poor indoor air quality negatively affects more than 15 million Americans who have asthma and the 28 million who suffer from hay fever and other allergies.
  • It is recommended we drink approximately two quarts of clean water each day. By comparison, we inhale approximately 15,000 quarts of air each day.
  • More than 15 million Americans are estimated to have asthma, including one in 13 school-age children.
  • Because they breathe faster than adults, children inhale 50% more air per pound of body weight than adults and are especially sensitive to air quality problems.

NEED HELP? TALK TO AN EXPERT
CONTACT NORTHEAST HEATING & COOLING

HVAC Maintenance Tips

You wouldn’t drive your car 100,000 miles without changing the oil. The same logic holds true for your home comfort system. Regular HVAC preventative maintenance is the best way to ensure trouble-free operation and peak performance. Pre-season maintenance is also important. It can help to avoid a system failure in severe hot or cold weather when you need it most, and it can also keep your energy bill from getting out of control.

WHEN SHOULD I DO FURNACE MAINTENANCE?

The old adage is true: an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Below you’ll find our Preventative Maintenance Checklist, which is our proven method to keep your system in the pink and your home in constant comfort.

  • For a system that heats and cools: perform maintenance in the spring and fall
  • For cooling system maintenance only: perform maintenance at least once a year, before the cooling season
  • For furnace maintenance only: perform maintenance at least once a year, before the heating season.

HVAC PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE CHECKLIST

Contact us and we will perform the following tasks, depending on the unit:

OUTDOOR UNITS

  • Inspect unit for proper refrigerant level and adjust if necessary
  • Clean dirt, leaves and debris from inside cabinet
  • Inspect base pan for restricted drain openings—remove obstructions as necessary
  • Inspect coil and cabinet—clean as needed
  • Inspect fan motor and fan blades for wear and damage—on older models lubricate as needed
  • Inspect control box, associated controls/accessories, wiring and connections. Controls may include contactors, relays, circuit boards, capacitors, sump heat and other accessories. All control box and electrical parts should be checked for wear or damage.
  • Inspect compressor and associated tubing for damage

INDOOR UNITS

  • Inspect and clean blower assembly (includes blower housing, blower wheel and motor)
  • On older models, lubricate motor and inspect and replace fan belt if needed
  • Check combustion blower housing for lint and debris and clean as necessary
  • Inspect evaporator coil, drain pan and condensate drain lines. Clean as needed
  • Inspect for gas leaks in gas furnaces
  • Inspect burner assembly—clean and adjust as needed
  • Inspect ignition system and safety controls—clean and adjust as needed
  • Inspect heat exchanger or heating elements
  • Inspect flue system—check for proper attachment to the furnace, any dislocated sections, and for signs of corrosion. Replace if necessary.
  • Inspect control box, associated controls, wiring and connections
  • Clean or replace air filters
  • Inspect conditioned airflow system (ductwork)—check for leaks

WHILE YOUR SYSTEM IS OPERATING

  • Monitor system starting characteristics and capabilities
  • Listen for abnormal noise
  • Search for source of unusual odors
  • Monitor air conditioning and heat pump systems for correct refrigerant charge
  • Measure outdoor dry bulb temperature
  • Measure indoor dry and wet bulb temperature
  • Measure high and low side system pressures
  • Monitor gas furnace for correct line and manifold gas pressure—make adjustments as needed
  • Measure temperature rise and adjust airflow as needed
  • Check vent system for proper operation
  • Monitor system for correct line and load volts/amps
  • Monitor system operation per manufacturer’s specifications
  • Provide system operation report and recommend repairs or replacement as necessary

HOW CAN I GET THE MOST OUT OF MY TRANE HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS?

Trane systems are designed to provide optimal efficiency and comfort. Now it’s time to do the same to your home. Here are some things you can do around the house to optimize the operation of your system, as well as the comfort inside your home.

COOLING SYSTEM MAINTENANCE

  • Set the thermostat as high as comfort will permit.
  • Make sure attics are adequately ventilated to relieve heat buildup. If necessary, improve airflow by adding or enlarging vents.
  • When building a new house or renovating an old one, choose light-colored roof shingles to reflect more of the sun’s heat.
  • During moderate weather, don’t use the air conditioner unnecessarily.
  • Draw blinds or drapes to block the sunlight during the hottest part of the day.
  • Install awnings over windows exposed to direct sunlight.
  • In the cooling season, don’t run kitchen and bath exhaust fans longer than necessary.
  • Don’t place lamps, TV sets or other heat-producing devices beneath a wall-mounted thermostat. Rising heat from that equipment may cause the air conditioning system to overcool your house.

HEATING & FURNACE MAINTENANCE

  • Locate the thermostat on an inside wall away from windows and doors.
  • Set the thermostat as low as comfort permits. Each degree over 68°F can add 3% to the amount of energy needed for heating.
  • People generate heat. So lower the thermostat a degree or two when expecting a large group of guests.

INSULATION

  • Make sure your home is properly insulated. This is the single most important step in conserving energy. Thermal insulation should be specified in terms of thermal resistance (R-values). R-30 (10″) is recommended for ceilings, and R-11 (3-1/2”) for exterior walls and floors over unheated areas. In colder climates, consider additional insulation.
  • Infiltration of humid outside air is your heating and air conditioning system’s worst enemy—it could account for 15% to 30% of air conditioning energy requirements. Find the places where air can sneak into the home and plug them with caulking, weather-stripping or plastic. Also, weather-strip and caulk around all entrance doors and windows.
  • Cut heat transfer through your windows by 40% to 50% with double-glazing (two panes of glass separated by a sealed air space) and low-e glass.
  • Use wood- or metal-frame storm windows even if single-glazed windows are high quality. The extra layer of glass and the layer of still air will cut heat transfer considerably.
  • Install storm doors at all entrances to your house.
  • Keep all windows and doors closed.
  • Remember that by increasing the glass area, you increase the amount of heat added in summer and lost in winter.
  • Make sure fireplaces have tight-fitting dampers, which can be closed when the fireplace is not in use. Invest in a humidifier to conserve energy in winter. The air in your home won’t be as dry, so you stay comfortable at a lower temperature setting.

www.northeasthc.com – Your Local Trane Comfort Specialist

Put Your Home Comfort on Cruise Control

Trane TruComfort variable speed systems provide the ultimate in comfort and energy savings. Instead of cycling on and off at full capacity like conventional systems, Trane TruComfort systems run at the lowest speed needed for the current weather conditions, helping homeowners save energy and money. See how it works in the video below!

As your local Trane Comfort Specialist, we look forward to giving you the highest level of indoor comfort, with increased energy efficiency to save you money! Call us at (800) 691-0122 to schedule an in-home consultation today.

Northeast Heating & Cooling Featured on Ask This Old House Episode: Zoning Your Home (WATCH)

The vast majority of homes in the U.S. have a forced air system (75%-85%), but less than 5% of these homes have any form of zoning.  By zoning your home we can balance your system, making all rooms the right temperature.  Here’s the good news.  Just about any home can be properly zoned!

We recently teamed up with Richard Trethewey on an episode of Ask This Old House to zone a home.  Click below to watch our episode.  Have questions?  Call Northeast Heating & Cooling at (800) 691-0122.

 

The Benefits of Zoning Your Home

Zoned comfort. With Trane’s innovative ComfortLink™ II Zoning System, you’ll be able to direct more heated or cooled air where it is needed-and less where it isn’t. So room by room or zone by zone, you will enjoy steady precise comfort on demand.Most homes don’t get the same amount of sun or shade all day, so why would you expect to need the same type of cooling or heating all day? With Trane’s ComfortLink II Zoning system, you’ll be able to set a schedule on your thermostat based on your home’s unique temperature patterns and control it all from wherever life takes you with Nexia Home Intelligence. Every ComfortLink II Control comes with remote “climate access”, allowing you to monitor and control your zoning system through any web-enabled device.

TRANE COMFORTLINK II CONTROL

At the heart of your Trane zoning system, you’ll find the Trane ComfortLink II Control. It’s more than a thermostat—it’s an easy-to-use advanced command center that provides a seamless interface between your system and your life.

WIRED ZONE THERMOSTAT/SENSOR

Acting as both a sensor and a zone thermostat, the temperature data is relayed to the Trane ComfortLink II Control, while also allowing temperature adjustment of an individual zone. Perfect for a master bedroom or guest room.

WIRED ZONE SENSOR

This sensor provides temperature data to the Trane ComfortLink II Control, allowing heated and cooled air to be directed where it’s needed. The temperature in zones with a Wired Zone Sensor is adjusted using the Trane ComfortLinkII Control. Perfect for a child’s room or hallway.

MOTORIZED MODULATING DAMPERS

Trane’s exclusive motorized modulating dampers work inside your ductwork by opening and closing in partial increments so you can fine-tune zoned areas for maximum comfort.

SYNCHRONIZED COMFORT

Connect your Trane ComfortLink II Control and zoning equipment to a perfectly matched Trane variable-speed indoor unit and multi-stage outdoor unit and you’ll see for yourself. Every component is designed to work in harmony with the others—optimizing your comfort and energy use combined with the enhanced humidity control you’ll only find with a Trane matched system.

Call Northeast Heating & Cooling, your local Trane Comfort Specialist, to experience total comfort control! (800) 691-0122.

Northeast Heating & Cooling Earns Esteemed 2013 Angie’s List Super Service Award

Award reflects company’s consistently high level of customer service

Northeast Heating & Cooling has earned the service industry’s coveted Angie’s List Super Service Award, reflecting an exemplary year of service provided to members of the consumer review service in 2013.

“Only about 5 percent of the companies Northeast Heating & Cooling competes with are able to earn our Super Service Award,” said Angie’s List Founder Angie Hicks. “It’s a mark of consistently great customer service.”

Angie’s List Super Service Award 2013 winners have met strict eligibility requirements, which include an “A” rating in overall grade, recent grade, and review period grade; the company must be in good standing with Angie’s List, have a fully complete profile, pass a background check and abide by Angie’s List operational guidelines.

Service company ratings are updated daily on Angie’s List. Companies are graded on an A through F scale in areas ranging from price to professionalism to punctuality. Members can find the 2013 Super Service Award logo next to company names in search results on AngiesList.com.

Heating & Cooling System Maintenance Tips

You wouldn’t drive your car 100,000 miles without changing the oil. The same logic holds true for your home comfort system. Regular HVAC preventative maintenance is the best way to ensure trouble-free operation and peak performance. Pre-season maintenance is also important. It can help to avoid a system failure in severe hot or cold weather when you need it most, and it can also keep your energy bill from getting out of control.

WHEN SHOULD I DO FURNACE MAINTENANCE?

The old adage is true: an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Below you’ll find our Preventative Maintenance Checklist, which is our proven method to keep your system in the pink and your home in constant comfort.

  • For a system that heats and cools: perform maintenance in the spring and fall
  • For cooling system maintenance only: perform maintenance at least once a year, before the cooling season
  • For furnace maintenance only: perform maintenance at least once a year, before the heating season.

HVAC PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE CHECKLIST

Many dealers provide priority service for their customers who have an annual maintenance or service agreement. Bi-annual preventative maintenance will ensure that your system runs as efficiently as possible. Your local dealer will perform the following tasks, depending on the unit:

OUTDOOR UNITS

  • Inspect unit for proper refrigerant level and adjust if necessary
  • Clean dirt, leaves and debris from inside cabinet
  • Inspect base pan for restricted drain openings—remove obstructions as necessary
  • Inspect coil and cabinet—clean as needed
  • Inspect fan motor and fan blades for wear and damage—on older models lubricate as needed
  • Inspect control box, associated controls/accessories, wiring and connections. Controls may include contactors, relays, circuit boards, capacitors, sump heat and other accessories. All control box and electrical parts should be checked for wear or damage.
  • Inspect compressor and associated tubing for damage

INDOOR UNITS

  • Inspect and clean blower assembly (includes blower housing, blower wheel and motor)
  • On older models, lubricate motor and inspect and replace fan belt if needed
  • Check combustion blower housing for lint and debris and clean as necessary
  • Inspect evaporator coil, drain pan and condensate drain lines. Clean as needed
  • Inspect for gas leaks in gas furnaces
  • Inspect burner assembly—clean and adjust as needed
  • Inspect ignition system and safety controls—clean and adjust as needed
  • Inspect heat exchanger or heating elements
  • Inspect flue system—check for proper attachment to the furnace, any dislocated sections, and for signs of corrosion. Replace if necessary.
  • Inspect control box, associated controls, wiring and connections
  • Clean or replace air filters
  • Inspect conditioned airflow system (ductwork)—check for leaks

WHILE YOUR SYSTEM IS OPERATING

  • Monitor system starting characteristics and capabilities
  • Listen for abnormal noise
  • Search for source of unusual odors
  • Monitor air conditioning and heat pump systems for correct refrigerant charge
  • Measure outdoor dry bulb temperature
  • Measure indoor dry and wet bulb temperature
  • Measure high and low side system pressures
  • Monitor gas furnace for correct line and manifold gas pressure—make adjustments as needed
  • Measure temperature rise and adjust airflow as needed
  • Check vent system for proper operation
  • Monitor system for correct line and load volts/amps
  • Monitor system operation per manufacturer’s specifications
  • Provide system operation report and recommend repairs or replacement as necessary

HOW CAN I GET THE MOST OUT OF MY HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS?

Here are some things you can do around the house to optimize the operation of your system, as well as the comfort inside your home.

COOLING SYSTEM MAINTENANCE

  • Set the thermostat as high as comfort will permit.
  • Make sure attics are adequately ventilated to relieve heat buildup. If necessary, improve airflow by adding or enlarging vents.
  • When building a new house or renovating an old one, choose light-colored roof shingles to reflect more of the sun’s heat.
  • During moderate weather, don’t use the air conditioner unnecessarily.
  • Draw blinds or drapes to block the sunlight during the hottest part of the day.
  • Install awnings over windows exposed to direct sunlight.
  • In the cooling season, don’t run kitchen and bath exhaust fans longer than necessary.
  • Don’t place lamps, TV sets or other heat-producing devices beneath a wall-mounted thermostat. Rising heat from that equipment may cause the air conditioning system to overcool your house.

HEATING & FURNACE MAINTENANCE

  • Locate the thermostat on an inside wall away from windows and doors.
  • Set the thermostat as low as comfort permits. Each degree over 68°F can add 3% to the amount of energy needed for heating.
  • People generate heat. So lower the thermostat a degree or two when expecting a large group of guests.

INSULATION

  • Make sure your home is properly insulated. This is the single most important step in conserving energy. Thermal insulation should be specified in terms of thermal resistance (R-values). R-30 (10″) is recommended for ceilings, and R-11 (3-1/2”) for exterior walls and floors over unheated areas. In colder climates, consider additional insulation.
  • Infiltration of humid outside air is your heating and air conditioning system’s worst enemy—it could account for 15% to 30% of air conditioning energy requirements. Find the places where air can sneak into the home and plug them with caulking, weather-stripping or plastic. Also, weather-strip and caulk around all entrance doors and windows.
  • Cut heat transfer through your windows by 40% to 50% with double-glazing (two panes of glass separated by a sealed air space) and low-e glass.
  • Use wood- or metal-frame storm windows even if single-glazed windows are high quality. The extra layer of glass and the layer of still air will cut heat transfer considerably.
  • Install storm doors at all entrances to your house.
  • Keep all windows and doors closed.
  • Remember that by increasing the glass area, you increase the amount of heat added in summer and lost in winter.
  • Make sure fireplaces have tight-fitting dampers, which can be closed when the fireplace is not in use. Invest in a humidifier to conserve energy in winter. The air in your home won’t be as dry, so you stay comfortable at a lower temperature setting.

Dateline NBC Investigates Air Conditioning Repairmen

Watch this video below to see the importance of choosing an HVAC company that you can trust!

CONTACT US